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Monday, May 15

  1. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate PRESTUDY: Copper can form two possible cations, cu…
    The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate
    PRESTUDY:
    Copper can form two possible cations, cuprous (Cu+1) and cupric (Cu+2). When solid copper is reacted with a silver nitrate solution, two reactions are possible, as shown in the following equations:
    (a)
    AgNO3 (aq) + Cu(s) ===> Ag(s) + CuNO3 (aq)
    Ag+1(aq) + Cu(s) ===> Ag(s) + Cu+1(aq)
    (b)
    2 AgNO3 (aq) + Cu(s) ===> 2 Ag(s) + Cu(NO3)2 (aq)
    2 Ag+1(aq) + Cu(s) ===> 2 Ag(s) + Cu+2(aq)
    How many grams of metallic silver can form from 4.613 g of copper metal according to equation (a)?
    How many grams of metallic silver can form from 4.613 g of copper metal according to equation (b)?
    A student reacts 4.613 grams of copper with a solution containing excess silver nitrate and recovers 6.715 g of silver metal. Which reaction, (a) or (b), most likely occurred in his experiment? Explain your answer completely.

    INTRODUCTION:
    Metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate react in solution to produce metallic copper, which is seen precipitating as a finely divided red powder. This type of reaction, in which one metal "displaces" another from a solution of one of its salts, is known as a Single Displacement reaction. A metal capable of displacing another from a solution of one of its salts is said to be "more active" than the displaced metal. In this experiment, iron is more active than copper.
    (view changes)
    6:12 am
  2. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited ... Calculate the moles of solid copper produced. Determine the ratio of Moles of solid copper pr…
    ...
    Calculate the moles of solid copper produced.
    Determine the ratio of Moles of solid copper produced to Moles of solid iron used.
    ...
    the procedure.
    FOLLOW UP QUESTIONS
    Write answers for the questions. Remember to use whole sentences. Pay close attention to grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
    (view changes)
    5:55 am
  3. page Chemistry Labs edited ... Experiment 13 - A Time for Slime Experiment 14 - Properties of Transition Metals and their Co…
    ...
    Experiment 13 - A Time for Slime
    Experiment 14 - Properties of Transition Metals and their Compounds
    ...
    15 - MolesThe Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate
    Moles
    of Iron
    Experiment 16 - Reactivity of Group 2 Metals
    (view changes)
    5:28 am
  4. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited ... INSTRUCTIONS: Each person in your lab group must read every page in this online procedure. Al…
    ...
    INSTRUCTIONS:
    Each person in your lab group must read every page in this online procedure. Along the way, there will be questions that you must answer.
    ...
    document Experiment 615 - ConservationThe Reaction of MassIron with Copper (II) Sulfate for the
    When this Google document opens, sign in to your Google account.
    From the FILE Menu, choose Make a copy...
    ...
    follows: Exp 615 - Period
    Share this document with the members of your group and with Mr. Skubis at HSTChemistry@gmail.com.
    As a group, answer all questions. Remember to use complete sentences and be mindful of grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
    ...
    Wash your hands thoroughly before leaving the laboratory.
    ANALYSIS
    In this activity you will measureDetermine the mass of your system both beforeIron used in each trial.
    Assume the Iron is the Limiting Reactant
    and after mixing. This will allow you to investigate the LawCuSO4 is in excess.
    Determine the moles
    of ConservationIron used in the experiment.
    After washing and drying the solid copper produced, determine its mass.
    Calculate the moles of solid copper produced.
    Determine the ratio of Moles of solid copper produced to Moles
    of Mass.solid iron used.
    Use the
    ...
    the procedure. In the Analysis column, record your interpretation of what happened in each step.
    FOLLOW UP QUESTIONS
    Write answers for the questions. Remember to use whole sentences. Pay close attention to grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
    (view changes)
    5:26 am
  5. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited ... EQUIPMENT: 100 mL graduated cylinder ... mL beaker (2) 250 mL flask Plastic bottle wi…
    ...
    EQUIPMENT:
    100 mL graduated cylinder
    ...
    mL beaker (2)
    250 mL flask
    Plastic bottle with cap
    Rubber balloon
    (2)
    Baking soda
    Vinegar
    Effervescent tablet
    Electronic Balance
    Small square of coffee filter

    Iron Powder
    1.0 M CuSO4
    Wooden stick
    Distilled water
    Acetone
    Hot Plate

    INSTRUCTIONS:
    Each person in your lab group must read every page in this online procedure. Along the way, there will be questions that you must answer.
    ...
    PROCEDURE:
    Using the data tables on the accompanying handout, RECORD OBSERVATIONS and/or DATA for each procedure step.
    ...
    performed SIMULTANEOUSLY.
    Weigh

    Weigh
    a clean,
    ...
    mL beaker. (Remember, you are doing 2 trials simultaneously)
    Accurately weigh approximately 1.00 gram of iron powder into the beaker. Do not exceed 1.00 grams.
    ...
    into an 250 mL Erlenmeyer flask,
    Slowly add the hot CuSO4 solution to the beaker containing the iron powder. Be sure the addition is slow to avoid excess frothing and possible loss of material. It will help to avoid frothing if a wooden applicator stick is placed in the beaker before adding the hot CuSO4 solution.
    Swirl the flask to insure completeness of reaction. When the reaction has ceased, allow the copper product to settle. Then carefully decant the liquid from the copper, (pour off the liquid and leave the solid behind). You may observe a thin copper colored sheen on the surface of the liquid that does not settle out. You may ignore this.
    ...
    For each run, calculate the moles of iron used and the moles of copper formed. Deduce whether iron goes into solution as Fe+2 or Fe+3.
    Disposal
    Baking soda packets and rubber balloons can be disposedFollow teacher directions for disposal of in the garbage.
    Vinegar can be disposed down the sink.
    Effervescent solutions can also be disposed down the sink.
    liquid and solid waste.
    Clean all glassware and return to the proper place.
    Clean all work surfaces and personal protective equipment as directed by your instructor.
    (view changes)
    5:12 am
  6. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited ... INTRODUCTION: Metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate react in solution to produc…
    ...
    INTRODUCTION:
    Metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate react in solution to produce metallic copper, which is seen precipitating as a finely divided red powder. This type of reaction, in which one metal "displaces" another from a solution of one of its salts, is known as a Single Displacement reaction. A metal capable of displacing another from a solution of one of its salts is said to be "more active" than the displaced metal. In this experiment, iron is more active than copper.
    ...
    your experiment.
    (1)
    Fe(s)

    (1)Fe(s)
    + CuSO4
    ...
    + Cu(s)
    Fe(s)

    Fe(s)
    + Cu+2(aq)
    ...
    + Cu(s)
    (2)
    2

    (2)2
    Fe(s) +
    ...
    3 Cu(s)
    2 Fe(s) + 3 Cu+2(aq) ===> 2 Fe+3(aq) + 3 Cu(s)
    An excess of copper (II) sulfate solution (to make sure that all the iron is reacted) will be added to a known amount of iron. The metallic copper produced will be weighed. These weighings will be used to calculate the moles of iron used and the moles of copper formed. If equation (1) is correct, the moles of copper should equal the moles of iron. If equation (2) is correct, we should obtain 1.5 moles of copper per mole of iron.
    ...
    PROCEDURE:
    Using the data tables on the accompanying handout, RECORD OBSERVATIONS and/or DATA for each procedure step.
    Part A: Baking SodaYou will perform and Vinegar - Open System
    Pour about 50
    report ONLY 2 trials of this experiment. BOTH trials will be performed SIMULTANEOUSLY.
    Weigh a clean, dry 250
    mL beaker.
    Accurately weigh approximately 1.00 gram
    of vinegariron powder into the 250-mL beaker. Place small scoopDo not exceed 1.00 grams.
    Measure 30 mL
    of baking soda onto the tissue square and fold the contents1.0 M CuSO4 solution into a neat little packet. Place the beaker of vinegargraduated cylinder. Pour it into an Erlenmeyer flask, and heat gently to almost boiling.
    Slowly add
    the packet of baking soda on the laboratory balance and record the total mass of these reactants and containers.
    Carefully place the packet into
    hot CuSO4 solution to the beaker and allowcontaining the chemical change (fizzing and bubbling) to fully react. To beiron powder. Be sure itthe addition is completed, carefully swirl the chemicalsslow to avoid excess frothing and observe. Measure and record the total masspossible loss of the products and containers using the same balance you used before.
    Part B: Baking Soda and Vinegar - Closed System
    Pour about 50 mL of vinegar into the plastic bottle using the funnel (to
    material. It will help to avoid getting the neck of the container wet). Prepare another packet of baking soda/tissue asfrothing if a wooden applicator stick is placed in Step 1 above, and measure and record the total mass of these reactants, bottle, and cap.
    Tilt
    beaker before adding the bottle (as much as possible without spillinghot CuSO4 solution.
    Swirl
    the contents), insert the packetflask to insure completeness of baking soda into its neck (being careful not to wet it), and tightly securereaction. When the cap. Tip the bottle upright andreaction has ceased, allow the contentscopper product to fully react. Measure and recordsettle. Then carefully decant the total mass ofliquid from the productscopper, (pour off the liquid and containers. Removeleave the cap andsolid behind). You may observe what occurs.
    Part C: Baking Soda and Vinegar - Closed System
    Pour about 50 mL of vinegar into
    a thin copper colored sheen on the 250-mL flask using the funnel to make certain the necksurface of the flaskliquid that does not get wet. This time, scoop the baking soda directly into the balloon as one classmate holds the balloon open. Measure and record the total masssettle out. You may ignore this.
    Add about 10 mL
    of distilled water to the reactants, flask,solid copper and balloon.
    Slip
    swirl to wash any remaining ions from the open end ofcopper.
    Decant
    the balloon overwash water from the mouthcopper and add 10 more mL of the flask making sure that the “bulb” of the balloon remains downward so contents do not spill outdistilled water, swirl and making sure the mouthdecant again.
    Now add several mL
    of the flaskacetone (CAUTION: Acetone is “sealed” withvery flammable) to the balloon. Tilt the balloon up tocopper. Swirl and allow the baking soda to fall into the flask allowing the reaction to fully react.
    Measure
    stand a few minutes and recorddecant off the total massacetone. Repeat with a second portion of acetone. The acetone readily dissolves the products, flask,water and balloon. Remove the balloonremoves it. The acetone is easily removed by gently heating or by using a stream of air since acetone has a low boiling point and observe what occurs.
    Part D: Water and Effervescent Tablet - Open System
    Thoroughly clean
    readily evaporates. We will use gentle heat.
    Heat
    the flask & fillbeaker with 50 mL of water.
    Obtain an effervescent tablet and carefully break it in half.
    Place
    the flask & half of an effervescent tabletcopper product on low heat on a hot plate to evaporate the balance & record the starting mass.
    Place the tablet into the flask
    acetone. Carefully break up any clumps of water. Swirl & wait 3 minutes.
    Once the reaction is complete, record the ending mass.
    Calculate the amount of mass changed.
    Part E: Water and Effervescent Tablet - Closed System
    Thoroughly clean the flask & fill
    copper with 50 mL of water.
    Place half of an effervescent tablet into
    a balloon.
    Place the balloon around the rim of the flask, but do
    spatula, if drying proves difficult. Be sure not letto remove any copper from the tablet fall intobeaker.
    When
    the water.
    Find & record
    copper is dry, carefully dry the starting massoutside of the flask & balloon with tablet.
    Lift the balloon, causing the tablet
    beaker and reweigh to fall intofind the water. Swirl & wait 3 minutes.
    Once
    mass of copper formed.
    For each run, calculate
    the reaction is complete, record the ending mass.
    Calculate
    moles of iron used and the amountmoles of mass changed.copper formed. Deduce whether iron goes into solution as Fe+2 or Fe+3.
    Disposal
    Baking soda packets and rubber balloons can be disposed of in the garbage.
    (view changes)
    5:06 am
  7. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited ... INTRODUCTION: Metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate react in solution to produc…
    ...
    INTRODUCTION:
    Metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate react in solution to produce metallic copper, which is seen precipitating as a finely divided red powder. This type of reaction, in which one metal "displaces" another from a solution of one of its salts, is known as a Single Displacement reaction. A metal capable of displacing another from a solution of one of its salts is said to be "more active" than the displaced metal. In this experiment, iron is more active than copper.
    Although this concept may seem obvious, it was not always so.
    When early scientists first began exploring chemical changes, they frequently did not consider the effects
    Iron forms 2 types of ions, namely Fe+2 and Fe+3. We shall use stoichiometric principles to determine which of these ions is formed in the airreaction between iron and other gases. Similarly,copper (II) sulfate solution. If Fe+2 is formed, then equation (1) is correct, while equation (2) is correct if Fe+3 is formed. Your task is to find out which equation is consistent with the equipment originally used often did not take into account the possibilityresults of your experiment.
    (1)
    Fe(s) + CuSO4 (aq) ===> FeSO4 (aq) + Cu(s)
    Fe(s) + Cu+2(aq) ===> Fe+2(aq) + Cu(s)
    (2)
    2 Fe(s) + 3 CuSO4 (aq) ===> Fe2(SO4)3 (aq) + 3 Cu(s)
    2 Fe(s) + 3 Cu+2(aq) ===> 2 Fe+3(aq) + 3 Cu(s)
    An excess of copper (II) sulfate solution (to make sure
    that a gas couldall the iron is reacted) will be added to a product or a reactant.known amount of iron. The metallic copper produced will be weighed. These weighings will be used to calculate the moles of iron used and the moles of copper formed. If equation (1) is correct, the moles of copper should equal the moles of iron. If equation (2) is correct, we should obtain 1.5 moles of copper per mole of iron.
    PURPOSE:
    In this experiment we will use stoichiometric principles to deduce the appropriate equation for the reaction between metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate.
    (view changes)
    4:53 am
  8. page The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate edited The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate INTRODUCTION: Metallic iron and a solution of copp…
    The Reaction of Iron with Copper (II) Sulfate
    INTRODUCTION:
    Metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate react in solution to produce metallic copper, which is seen precipitating as a finely divided red powder. This type of reaction, in which one metal "displaces" another from a solution of one of its salts, is known as a Single Displacement reaction. A metal capable of displacing another from a solution of one of its salts is said to be "more active" than the displaced metal. In this experiment, iron is more active than copper.
    Although this concept may seem obvious, it was not always so.
    When early scientists first began exploring chemical changes, they frequently did not consider the effects of the air and other gases. Similarly, the equipment originally used often did not take into account the possibility that a gas could be a product or a reactant.
    PURPOSE:
    In this experiment we will use stoichiometric principles to deduce the appropriate equation for the reaction between metallic iron and a solution of copper (II) sulfate.
    EQUIPMENT:
    100 mL graduated cylinder
    250 mL beaker
    250 mL flask
    Plastic bottle with cap
    Rubber balloon (2)
    Baking soda
    Vinegar
    Effervescent tablet
    Electronic Balance
    Small square of coffee filter
    INSTRUCTIONS:
    Each person in your lab group must read every page in this online procedure. Along the way, there will be questions that you must answer.
    Designate one person in your group as the Data Recorder. This person should open the Google document Experiment 6 - Conservation of Mass for the approved answer template.
    When this Google document opens, sign in to your Google account.
    From the FILE Menu, choose Make a copy...
    From the FILE Menu, choose Rename...and rename the document as follows: Exp 6 - Period (1, 3, 6, or 8) - Group #.
    Share this document with the members of your group and with Mr. Skubis at HSTChemistry@gmail.com.
    As a group, answer all questions. Remember to use complete sentences and be mindful of grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
    REMEMBER: **Plagiarism** is a form of **Academic Dishonesty** which carries harsh consequences. DO YOUR OWN WORK!
    PROCEDURE:
    Using the data tables on the accompanying handout, RECORD OBSERVATIONS and/or DATA for each procedure step.
    Part A: Baking Soda and Vinegar - Open System
    Pour about 50 mL of vinegar into the 250-mL beaker. Place small scoop of baking soda onto the tissue square and fold the contents into a neat little packet. Place the beaker of vinegar and the packet of baking soda on the laboratory balance and record the total mass of these reactants and containers.
    Carefully place the packet into the beaker and allow the chemical change (fizzing and bubbling) to fully react. To be sure it is completed, carefully swirl the chemicals and observe. Measure and record the total mass of the products and containers using the same balance you used before.
    Part B: Baking Soda and Vinegar - Closed System
    Pour about 50 mL of vinegar into the plastic bottle using the funnel (to avoid getting the neck of the container wet). Prepare another packet of baking soda/tissue as in Step 1 above, and measure and record the total mass of these reactants, bottle, and cap.
    Tilt the bottle (as much as possible without spilling the contents), insert the packet of baking soda into its neck (being careful not to wet it), and tightly secure the cap. Tip the bottle upright and allow the contents to fully react. Measure and record the total mass of the products and containers. Remove the cap and observe what occurs.
    Part C: Baking Soda and Vinegar - Closed System
    Pour about 50 mL of vinegar into the 250-mL flask using the funnel to make certain the neck of the flask does not get wet. This time, scoop the baking soda directly into the balloon as one classmate holds the balloon open. Measure and record the total mass of the reactants, flask, and balloon.
    Slip the open end of the balloon over the mouth of the flask making sure that the “bulb” of the balloon remains downward so contents do not spill out and making sure the mouth of the flask is “sealed” with the balloon. Tilt the balloon up to allow the baking soda to fall into the flask allowing the reaction to fully react.
    Measure and record the total mass of the products, flask, and balloon. Remove the balloon and observe what occurs.
    Part D: Water and Effervescent Tablet - Open System
    Thoroughly clean the flask & fill with 50 mL of water.
    Obtain an effervescent tablet and carefully break it in half.
    Place the flask & half of an effervescent tablet on the balance & record the starting mass.
    Place the tablet into the flask of water. Swirl & wait 3 minutes.
    Once the reaction is complete, record the ending mass.
    Calculate the amount of mass changed.
    Part E: Water and Effervescent Tablet - Closed System
    Thoroughly clean the flask & fill with 50 mL of water.
    Place half of an effervescent tablet into a balloon.
    Place the balloon around the rim of the flask, but do not let the tablet fall into the water.
    Find & record the starting mass of the flask & balloon with tablet.
    Lift the balloon, causing the tablet to fall into the water. Swirl & wait 3 minutes.
    Once the reaction is complete, record the ending mass.
    Calculate the amount of mass changed.
    Disposal
    Baking soda packets and rubber balloons can be disposed of in the garbage.
    Vinegar can be disposed down the sink.
    Effervescent solutions can also be disposed down the sink.
    Clean all glassware and return to the proper place.
    Clean all work surfaces and personal protective equipment as directed by your instructor.
    Wash your hands thoroughly before leaving the laboratory.
    ANALYSIS
    In this activity you will measure the mass of your system both before and after mixing. This will allow you to investigate the Law of Conservation of Mass.
    Use the tables in the approved handout to organize your observations and data described in the procedure. In the Analysis column, record your interpretation of what happened in each step.
    FOLLOW UP QUESTIONS
    Write answers for the questions. Remember to use whole sentences. Pay close attention to grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

    (view changes)
    4:41 am

Thursday, April 27

  1. page A Time for Slime edited ... (30 ml) 15 ml Do not add water to the glue. Use only 1 tablespoon of glue to make the glue …
    ...
    (30 ml)
    15 ml
    Do not add water to the glue. Use only 1 tablespoon of glue to make the glue solution.
    Add two tablespoons of water to 1 tablespoon of glue to make the glue solution.
    Try making 2 additional samples of slime with different amounts of borax solution and compare them to your first piece of slime. In each sample, follow the instructions to make the slime that you followed before, but change the amount of borax solution you add to make the slime. Be sure to record the exact ingredients you use.
    You may choose to give each sample of slime a different color to help you tell them apart.

    ANALYSIS:ANALYSIS:
    The glue has long flexible molecules in it called polymers. These polymer molecules slide past each other as a liquid.
    (view changes)
    11:22 am
  2. page A Time for Slime edited ... What to expect As you stir the borax and glue solutions together, the mixture becomes thick. …
    ...
    What to expect
    As you stir the borax and glue solutions together, the mixture becomes thick. It also attaches to the popsicle stick. When you pull slowly, your slime will stretch. However if you pull quickly it will break. Slime will slowly flow making it seem like a liquid, but it can also bounce which makes it seem a bit like a solid.
    Place 1 tablespoon of water inIn a small plastic cup. Add ¼glass beaker, prepare a borax solution by mixing 1 level teaspoon of borax.powdered borax into 60 ml of water. Mix until
    ...
    borax solution. If
    If
    you would
    ...
    1 tablespoon (15 ml) of water in anotherinto a plastic cup and
    ...
    1 tablespoon (15 ml) of Elmer's
    ...
    is your Sample 1 glue solution.
    Slowly pour all
    See table below.
    Measure 15 ml
    of the borax solution and add 1 drop of food coloring. Slowly pour the borax
    When you have some nice thick slime, pull it off the popsicle stick and move it back and forth between your hands. The more you play, the less sticky it gets.
    Try pulling the slime very slowly to see if it stretches.
    (view changes)
    10:13 am

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